Franchising can be seen as a journey from innocence to experience.

July 24, 2012

A death and a birth (both). It’s good to have a model once the inevitable pain arises.

Wikipedia: The repetitive lyrics are believed to have a connection with mythology. The song describes the ferryman as “the hooded old man at the rudder,” and seems to connect to the classic image of the Grim Reaper, a hooded being (usually a skeleton) who leads lost souls to “the other side,” also a lyric in the song.The ferryman demanding his payment is also similar to the Greek ferryman of the dead, Charon. He demanded an obolus (coin) to ferry dead souls across the River Styx. Those who did not pay were doomed to remain as ghosts, remaining on the plane of the mare, the restless dead. Therefore in former cultures coins were laid below the tongues of dead persons.

Psychopomp [guide of the souls]: In Jungian psychology, the psychopomp is a mediator between the unconscious and conscious realms. It is symbolically personified in dreams as a wise man or woman, or sometimes as a helpful animal. In many cultures, the shaman also fulfills the role of the psychopomp. This may include not only accompanying the soul of the dead, but also vice versa: to help at birth, to introduce the newborn child’s soul to the world (p. 36 of). This also accounts for the contemporary title of “midwife to the dying,” which is another form of psychopomp work.

Chris de Burgh, Don’t Pay the Ferryman, 1982


Don’t pay the Ferryman

October 27, 2008

The role that the franchise bar plays is an ancient one. Not all debts are settled with folding money and you should try not to, permanently, ransom your future life to avoid pain in the present.

Franchising is a tremendous adventure: Maybe even more if the outcome is a surprise.

Don’t Pay the Ferryman, Chris de Burgh

It was late at night on the open road, speeding like a man on run
A lifetime spent preparing for the journey.
He is closer now and the search is on, reading from a map in the mind:
Yes there’s that ragged hill and there’s a boat on the river.
And when the rain came down, he heard a wild dog howl
There were voices in the night
(Don’t do it!)
Voices out of sight
(Dont’t do it!)
Too many men have failed before, whatever you do;

Don’t pay the ferryman!
Don’t even fix a price!
Don’t pay the ferryman
Until he gets you to the other side.

In the rolling mist, then he gets on board, now there’ll be no turning back
Beware that hooded old man at the rudder.
And then the lightning flashed and the thunder roared,
and people calling out his name,
And dancing bones that jabbered-and-a-moaned on the water.
And then the ferryman said “There is trouble ahead,
So you must pay me now.”
(Don’t do it!)
“You must pay me now.”
(Don’t do it!)
And still that voice came from beyond, whatever you do;

Don’t pay the ferryman!
Don’t even fix a price!
Don’t pay the ferryman
Until he gets you to the other side.


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