Liar Loans deals: business brokers and specialized franchise bankers

September 27, 2012

The lie in the government guaranteed loan: inflated future sales and 6 times value on assets (leasehold and equipment).

Predatory franchise lending program

  1. An unsophisticated CDN buyer is steered by the broker to a specific Schedule 1 banker who can “make the deal happen”.
  2. Industry Canada application form/logo used as bait, as credibility.
  3. Loan paperwork is only ever seen by government auditors IF a claim is made.
  4. Liar loans are never claimed as a loss to Industry Canada (above 3% interest, admin fees, $ above real value more than make up for reckless underwriting).
  5. Deal is papered within 24 hours including compliant appraisal.
  6. Bank’s money in; franchisee’s money in.
  7. Money out of franchisee’s current account: a. to franchisor who pays broker and b. bank’s own treasury.
  8. Sales never show up. Value of franchise on a cash flow basis is negative. Franchisees subsidize and burn through rest of life savings.
  9. Franchisor manages the inevitable business collapse.
  10. Bank’s receiver sells assets at 15% of previous value within 18 months to franchisor.
  11. Consortium repeats steps (go to 1).


If you lost your money, Call your franchise banker.

October 27, 2010

Get smart.

Who do you think teaches new franchisors or amateurs like David Scenna (Hookers and Booze: Your tax dollars at work) franchise money management?

D’oh.

Your franchisor is nothing much more than a rodeo clown.

  • The brains behind the outfit are the franchise bankers. Only a fraction of the government loan losses are claimed because accurate reporting would queer the deal. They self-finance the used franchises via compliant equipment appraisers on the front end and their captured bank receivers on the other (exit franchisee into bankruptcy.
  • See 2005 details.
  • Crapola franchises.

Last time I checked, +80% of Canada Small Business Financing program loans were done via these people below. Why not give them a call and ask them for a 10 minute interview?

Bank of Nova Scotia
Mr. John Dykeman
Ms. Irene Thomson
National Franchise Programs
Phone: (877) 252-6088 Toll Free
http://www.scotiabank.com/franchising
franchising@scotiabank.com

BMO Bank of Montreal
Mr. Steve Iskierski
Senior Manager, National Franchising Services
Phone: (416)927-6026 / (877)629-6262
Web: http://www.bmo.com/franchise
steve.iskierski@bmo.com

Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce, CIBC
Mr. Charles Scrivener
Director & Head, CIBC Packaged Loans Group
Phone: (416) 980-3225
http://www.cibc.com
charles.scrivener@cibc.com

Royal Bank of Canada
Mr. Paul DaSilva
National Franchise Market
Phone: (416) 974-8299
http://www.rbcroyalbank.com/franchise
paul.dasilva@rbc.com

TD Canada Trust
Ms. Irene Law
National Manager, Franchise Banking
Phone: (866) 871-2178 / (416) 307-9270
http://www.tdcanadatrust.com/franchise
irene.law@td.com

Source of contact information


Sotos LLP: The McDonalds of CDN franchisee lawyers?

November 27, 2009

I have learned directly, personally, in-their-armpits relationships from the best in franchising.

Ted Gorski, McDonald’s, CollegePro Painters, Nutri-Lawn, Tony Martin, Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce, Sam Grange, John Lorinc, Paul Herminston, Katherine Swinton, Canadian Franchise Association, Country Style, Gillian Hadfield, Michael Webster, Jay Harris, etc. They’re all brilliant in their areas of expertise.

When I got into a corner and thought I needed legal help I hired the best I couldn’t afford. John Sotos was my on-and-off-again lawyer from 1998 t0 2000 and I learned a great many things from John and his partner David Sterns. Both John and Michael told me to look at and talk to the banks. Oddly enough, the first lawyer I talked to about franchising in 1982 is now a Ontario Superior Court justice in Barrie. I like lawyers but they’ve got to cover their rent too, you know!

Many franchisees want to fight.

That’s good…and bad at the same time.

Many franchisees think in terms of black and white; now or never; us/them.

That’s good…and bad at the same time.

Many franchisees would rather choose a “white knight” professional instead of a group of franchisees plotting their own course.

That’s not good…and really, really horribly bad.

The McDonald’s U.S.A. president described his corporation as a real estate company with an interest in hamburgers. Let me repeat: McDonald’s is a landlord (to franchisees) with an interest in fast food.

I learned that the economics of modern litigation is very similar.

  1. The franchise industry legal cash flows = 95% by franchisors,
  2. Once the retainer is paid any consultants are shown the door (only one expert, please),
  3. Franchisees are one-shot clients (v. repeat business for franchisors),
  4. Disclosure laws are a God-send for billable hours, and
  5. The industry has a very, very long memory for those that oppose it’s interests.

All lawyers are businesspeople that operate in a near-monopoly on certain words and concepts.

Learning these terms is not hard if you have (1) a learning tool and (2) a willingness to face some difficult facts.

Most let their emotions rule their decision making (ie. denial and fear) but in their defense, aren’t really conscious of doing so. They’ve been conditioned to be on their knees and look to Daddy for acceptance.

Education is the only way out.

WikiFranchise.org


Collusion allegation: AUS bank and franchisor

September 18, 2008

In a Smart Company article by James Thomson called MP renews calls for investigations into mistreatment of Bakers Delight franchisee, he quotes:

NSW parliamentarian Joanna Gash has renewed calls for the Australian Federal Police to launch an investigation into accusations Bakers Delight and ANZ bank colluded to put a franchisee out of business.

Quoting emails between the franchisor and the bank, Gash alleges:

On Monday, Gash revisited the case in Parliament, producing emails from Bakers Delight chief financial officer Richard Taylor and ANZ executives that she says shows “plans had been conspired to terminate Ms de Leeuw’s franchise well ahead of time”.

The bank and franchisor deny all the allegations.

This is the first public AUS public allegation of the key franchisor:franchise banker relationship that I identified and wrote about in a 2005 paper for Industry Canada called Franchising Opportunism [free download].

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police did a 10 month investigation of a related predatory franchise lending matter. [free download: Mounties investigate ‘predatory lending’, Ottawa Citizen, March 25, 2006]

And Mr. Oudovikine is accusing the bank of transferring the loans to Country Style without his authorization before he had a chance to obtain a business plan and other financial details from Country Style.

Mr. Oudovikine says his case shows how big banks, franchisors and franchise brokers team up to take advantage of franchisees, many of whom are recent immigrants like him.

“It’s predatory lending. (CIBC) didn’t do any of the due diligence they should have done,” says Mr. Oudovikine, who sent the Citizen e-mails confirming the RCMP investigation. An RCMP official said the police force doesn’t confirm or deny investigation.

And the Canadian bank’s reaction?

Mr. Oudovikine says he has repeatedly contacted senior CIBC officials and executives about the loan dispute, to little effect. He alleges that CIBC breached the Canada Small Business Financing Act regulations that require lenders to conduct due diligence on borrowers, including their ability to repay loans.


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