Every breath you take, Every move you make, Every bond you break, Every step you take…

August 2, 2010

I never thought this was a silly love song.

I got immediately that this was a very angry, nasty tune.

Sting later said he was disconcerted by how many people think the song is more positive than it is. He insists it’s about unrequited love (the song was written at the time he and his then wife divorced), about the obsession with the lost lover, the jealousy and surveillance that followed. “One couple told me ‘Oh we love that song; it was the main song played at our wedding!’ I thought, ‘Well, good luck.'” When asked why he appears angry in the music video Sting told BBC Radio 2, “I think the song is very, very sinister and ugly and people have misinterpreted it as being a gentle, little love song.” Source

Every Breath You Take, The Police in 1983

Every breath you take
Every move you make
Every bond you break
Every step you take
I’ll be watching you

Every single day
Every word you say
Every game you play
Every night you stay
I’ll be watching you

Oh can’t you see
You belong to me
How my poor heart aches
With every step you take

Every move you make
Every vow you break
Every smile you fake
Every claim you stake
I’ll be watching you

Since you’ve gone I’ve been lost without a trace
I dream at night, I can only see your face
I look around but it’s you I can’t replace
I feel so cold and I long for your embrace
I keep calling baby, baby please…

Oh can’t you see
You belong to me
How my poor heart aches
With every step you take

Every move you make
Every vow you break
Every smile you fake
Every claim you stake
I’ll be watching you

Every move you make
Every step you take
I’ll be watching you
I’ll be watching you

Every breath you take
Every move you make
Every bond you break
Every step you take (I’ll be watching you)

Every single day
Every word you say
Every game you play
Every night you stay (I’ll be watching you)

Every move you make
Every vow you break
Every smile you fake
Every claim you stake (I’ll be watching you)

Every single day
Every word you say
Every game you play
Every night you stay (I’ll be watching you)

Every breath you take
Every move you make
Every bond you break
Every step you take (I’ll be watching you)

Every single day
Every word you say
Every game you play
Every night you stay (I’ll be watching you)

Every move you make
Every vow you break
Every smile you fake
Every claim you stake (I’ll be watching you)

Every single day
Every word you say
Every game you play
Every night you stay (I’ll be watching you)


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Acceptance: Are the bad old days of franchising over?

July 30, 2009

KublerRossI don’t know.

But there are grounds for real hope.

In the last 20 years or so, franchisees have been treated with an increasingly heavy hand:

  • communication between them is really discouraged,
  • informal leaders are penalized severely,
  • threats replaced any pretense of partnership and
  • most franchise lawyers treated ongoing franchisee-led groups with disinterest.

In short, many franchisees were bullied once they signed up.

Elisabeth Kübler-Ross defined stages in grief: denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance.

  • I think I’ve experienced and watched, up close, as a $100-billion Canadian franchise industry has gone through these stages.
  • Information flows have opened things up tremendously with the the new social technologies. Impossible to do, even 5 years ago (digital, decentralized,  real-time surveillance and digital archiving via Twitter and WikidFranchise.org, YouTube state-of-the-union addresses, anonymous if needed).

They’re not complete and there are dinosaur franchisors out there. But there is something different in the air.

If I were a franchisee these days, I would definitely talk to a competent industry business “coach” and join with peers to constructively work away at improving your core business. Don’t be small time cheap: think of 1/2 of your net worth going once you blow-off your current life partner. (perspective is everything)

Yes there are problems: but deal first with the 95% of the business concerns that have zero to do with what your franchisor does or fails to do.

The form I suggest that is most appropriate is an Attorneyless Franchisee Network, AFN.


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