Where’s Mark Bryers? With Waldo in AUS, of course.

September 4, 2008

The children’s game, “Where’s Waldo?” was a big hit with my kids a few years back. Here is a link to Waldo Wiki for some fun.

Otherwise, it appears from New Zealand’s One NEWS that the Blue Chip founder is somewhere in Australia (Blue Chip hope sparked by frozen funds).

Hundreds of Blue Chip investors across New Zealand have been given fresh hope that they might be able to recover millions of dollars worth of deposits for apartments they never wanted to buy.

The High Court has frozen funds in solicitors trust accounts until a full hearing takes place later this year…

We’ll wait and see if any cash actually surfaces from freezing the lawyer’s escrow accounts for the 2,000 seniors (mostly) who have lost over $84-million.

It does seem that Mr. Mark Bryers is keeping a pretty low profile these days. It appears that lawyers are having a hard time tracking him down in Australia to serve him with bankruptcy papers.

And what does one of the 2,000 investors [$1-million lost as a condition of re-locating to Britain] have to say about Bryers’s moving to Australia?.

“And now he’s off to Australia to do the same to people over there, I just – unbelievable,” says Blue Chip investor Michelle Hickman.

Altered loan documents, fraud and an agency relationship you say? Mrs. Hickman’s intrepid barrister Paul Dale:

“Certainly on the affidavit evidence we have filed to date, there has been fraud. We have produced examples of altered loan documents,” says Paul Dale the investors’ Barrister…

Dale says he has got powerful evidence of a profit sharing agreement between Greenstone and Blue Chip which would have seen money flow to Mark Bryers when apartment projects like this were completed.

Like I said before [Oz Alert: Shrewd businessmen immigrating], if you bump into Mr. Bryers or Bob Bangerter, let me know.

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Kiwi scams touch all classes of immigrants

August 23, 2008

The latest New Zealand Herald article on Blue Chip by Maria Slade [Immigrant banker put $1.7m in Blue Chip] is interesting for at least three reasons.

One, it points to a specific truth about fraud: all levels of class, education, access to financial counselling and sophistication are vulnerable:

  • 2,000 mostly seniors living on a fixed income and a millionaire British investment banker (Blue Chip) or
  • dozens of barely literate Indian and Chinese arrivals with Green Acres and Green Power franchises.

Quickly:

A British investment banker who came to New Zealand for a better lifestyle invested $1.7 million in 19 apartments through Blue Chip. Now Neil and Michelle Hickman are pinning their hopes on court action to recover some of their losses.

Mr Hickman gave up his career as a successful investment banker and moved his family to New Zealand two years ago, intending to live off his wealth.

Two, immigrants are considered prime protein by some franchise systems. New arrivals who invest large sums are often given special treatment [some expected; some not].

  • Several franchisors aggressively market their systems overseas to potential new immigrants using their government’s investor programs as a proven successful fraud technique: a badge of authority.

And three, for perhaps the most understated comment to date from a deeply betrayed person whose wife and three children are living in rented quarters while he goes back to work in Britain to make ends meet:

“Talk about a bad year,” Mr Hickman said.


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